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Self Defence with a modern twist

Luk Dim Boon Kwun - Progressive Wing Chun Milton Keynes

Lim Dim Boon Kwan - 6.5 Point Pole Form - Introduction

The Pole from is the Shortest form within the Wing Chun System. It is taught by Progressive Wing Chun Milton Keynes once a student reaches Black Belt. Although the movements are not actually from a Wing Chun perspective they do however follow Wing Chun principles and Theories.

When using the pole to attack, you should attack the nearest target normally the hand of the opponent that is holding the pole; you are then free to continue your attack.

When using the pole to defend against a weapon you can use the pole to thrust out with a great advantage because of the length of the pole but you must be aware that the pole is easily put off balance due to the weight of the pole and the way you hold it being at on end.

The Wing Chun practitioner stands in a low Horse Stance and this is to supply power to the base with a low Centre of Gravity.

The pole is named after how many movements there are in the form and not how long the pole is. The Wing Chun Pole is traditionally 7 feet 2 inches long and tapered at one end like a snooker cue. This is so that when you use the pole to strike, you can get a whip out of the pole to maximise power. When holding the pole the hand that is closest to the end of the pole is in a Palm-down Grip while the other hand is in a Palm-up Grip. The Pole is held at one end and not in the middle as some staff fighters, this is to maximise the distance between you and your opponent and to maximise striking power.

Luk Dim Boon Kwun - 6.5 Point Pole Form - Understanding

This is said to be the half movement, and can be seen as a block from an incoming Strike or a close quarter Strike to an opponent.

  1. Chir Gwon; The Thrust or Shoot The Thrust or Shoot has a drilling, spiral action to it to maximise penetration. This is delivered in a low Horse Stance to maximise power into the Strike and also ensure that you have a good strong Structure to deliver the strike.
  2. Til Gwon; Lifting Strike Til Gwon is the lifting strike, and is used to strike in an upward movement form the Groin of an opponent upwards. Til Gwon is performed in the Hanging or Cat Stance. In this stance the Back foot remains on the ground while the front or lead foot is lifted, the heel being off the ground and the toes lightly touching the floor. This is so you can readily transfer your weight/force forward in an attack i.e. Chir Gwon.
  3. Jut Gwon; Downward Strike Jut Gwon is the opposite of Til Gwon as it is the downward Strike form the head of an opponent down. Again this is performed in the Hanging or Cat Stance.
  4. Left Side Parry This is a deflection to the left side, creating an opening for a strike. To generate power you thrust the wrists down as you move to the left.
  5. Right Side Parry This is a deflection to the right side, creating an opening for a strike. To generate power you thrust the wrists down as you move to the right.
  6. Downward Strike The movement is the same as the parry movement but is used as a downward striking movement to the upper body of an opponent.

The pole form has two types of Stance and these are as follows:

Jaat Ma - Horse Stance

The horse stance is a low stance; the legs of the practitioner should be at approximately 90˚. This is to supply power to the base of the stance so that you can deliver a powerful strike accurately whilst maintaining your balance.

Using this type of weapon is different to using your arms because the weight and length of the pole changes your centre of gravity. Because you are striking at a greater a distance the stance needs to be stronger therefore lower and more stable.

Dil Ma - Hanging or Cat Stance

In this stance the rear foot remains on the ground while the front or lead foot is lifted, the heel being off the ground and the toes lightly touching the floor. This is so you can readily transfer your weight/force forward in an attack by stepping into the strike and changing your stance to deliver the strike into the low, wide horse stance i.e. Chir Gwon. The Cat Stance can be directly linked to the tradition Wing Chun Stance as the weight distribution is very similar. The pole is also held in the centre of the body

You can easily move from one stance to the other.

From the Horse Stance you can turn into the Cat Stance and bring the front leg in so that the weight is on the back Leg. You can then turn and drop into the Horse Stance from the Cat stance by stepping out and bending your knees to lower the stance.

Once a Progressive Wing Chun Milton Keynes student has achieved the pole form then they can move on to the knife form.

© Progressive Wing Chun Milton Keynes 2017